From Buck Rogers in 1939 to Blade Runner 2049…

0 | By Michael A. Robinson

Right now, on a big screen near you, Ryan Gosling’s character in Blade Runner 2049 is piloting a flying car known as a “Spinner” to hunt down renegade androids – replicants.

Image result for blade runner 2049

The flying car is an idea so old it’s almost timeless.

But I trace its modern beginnings back to 1926, when Henry Ford himself showed off the “sky flivver” – a tiny, 350-pound, single-seat monoplane – to the press.

Call it a “sky flivver,” a “plane car,” a “personal aircraft,” or a “flying car”… we’ve been waiting a long time.

Don’t Let “Some Investors” Talk You Out of Beating the Market

0 | By Michael A. Robinson

CNN Money’s Daniel Shane just put out a doozy.

Just take a look at this Oct. 5 headline: “China’s Tech Stocks Are Partying Like It’s 1999.”

“Shares in China’s biggest internet companies are on a tear this year,” Shane went on to write, “but some investors think things have gone too far.”

The guy didn’t even have the guts to make this argument himself. Instead, he leaned on “some investors.”

To me, this is just the latest rehash of the half-decade-old effort – among “some investors” – to prove that a Silicon Valley “tech bubble” was about to burst.

This time, there’s a slight twist. The bears’ latest “bubble” is across the Pacific Ocean, among Chinese web firms.

The idea at work here is that China’s entire e-commerce sector is about to go the way of the “dot-com” crash that slaughtered the Nasdaq Composite more than 17 years ago.

Here’s the thing. Shane’s entire premise is based on a false analysis. I think “some investors” may have led him astray.

Today, I’ll show you, with math, that the opposite is true.

I’ll prove that China’s web leaders are not in a bubble – and that they offer tech investors like you huge long-term upside.

Plus, we’ll investigate a great way to ride this trend for maximum profits – the kind of profits that keep beating the market year after year after year…

Recent Articles